COORDINATE REMOTE VIEWING


STAGE V

      A.  Concept:

         Stage V is unique among the remote viewing stages thus far discussed in that it does not rely on a direct link to the signal line to obtain the information reported. Instead, data is derived through accessing the information already available below the liminal threshold in the brain and autonomic nervous system. This information is deposited in earlier stages when the signal line passes through the system and "imprints" data on the brain by causing cognitrons to form through the rearrangement of the brain's neuronal clusters into the appropriate patterns, roughly analogous to what occurs in a computer's memory storage when it receives a data dump.

         Information "stored" in a cognitron can be accessed by a certain prompting methodology. In normal brain functioning, cognitrons are induced to deliver up the information they store through some stimulus delivered by the brain, much in the same way as a capacitor in an electronic circuit can be triggered to release its stored electric charge.

         When properly prompted, the information released consists of sub-elements which together form the complete cognitron. For example, the concept "religious" may be represented by one complete cognitron (cluster of neurons); each neuron would store a sub-element of that cognitron. Hence, the cognitron for "religious" could have neurons storing data for the following elements: "quiet," "incense," "harmonious chanting," "bowed heads," "robes," "candles," "dimly lit," "reverence," "worship," "respect," etc. If attention is paid to what underlies the concept of "religious" as it is originally evoked in Stage IV, the sub-elements, which may themselves provide valuable information far beyond their collective meaning of "religious," may be broken out and assembled. These sub-elements as they are brought forth in Stage V are known as "emanations" ("emanate" literally defined means, "to issue from a source, to flow forth, to emit, or to issue").

      B.  Definitions:

         1. Objects: An object is a thing that can be seen or touched. "Objects" can be understood as those physical items present at the site that helped cause the cognitron to form in the viewer's mind and hence prompt his response of "religious;" i.e., "robes," "candles," "incense," etc.

         2. Attributes: An attribute is a characteristic or quality of a person or thing. "Attributes" applies to those characteristics of the site that contributed to cognitron formation and the aforementioned viewer response: "quiet," "dimly lit," "echoing," "large," etc.

         3. Subjects: "Subject" is defined as "something dealt with in a discussion, study, etc.," "Subjects" are emanations that might serve a nominative function in describing the site, or be abstract intangibles, or they could be more specific terms dealing with function, purpose, nature, activities, inhabitants, etc., of the site: in the above example, "reverence," "worship," "respect," "harmonious chanting," etc.

         4. Topics: "Topic" is defined as "a subject of discourse or of a treatise; a theme for discussion." Closely related to "subjects," "topics" often prove to be sub-elements of one or more of the subjects already listed, and frequently are quite specific: "mass," "Catholic," "priest," "communion," and so forth. An interesting phenomenon to be here considered is that just as one of the subjects encountered may produce several topics, a topic itself may in turn be considered as a subject and produce topics of its own. This construction appears to be very hierarchical and "fractalized," with larger cognitrons being subdivided into smaller ones, which in turn can be further divided, and so on. In fact, any emanation thus "broken out," or "stage-fived" can itself often be further "stage-fived," and subdivided into its own object/attribute/subject/topic categories.

      C.  Format and Structure:

         Because extreme caution must be exercised to avoid phrases or promptings that might either induce AOL or otherwise unnecessarily engage the viewer's analytic mental processes, a sort of "hypo-stimulative" type of referral system must be used to "target" the viewer. This is accomplished by dividing the possible types of emanations obtainable into four categories: objects, attributes, subjects, and topics, then prompting the release of subliminally-held information by saying and writing "Emanations," followed only by a question mark.

         In actual execution, the Stage V format would look somewhat as follows:

religious
objects
emanations?

robes
candles
incense

     
  religious
attributes
emanations?

quiet
dimly lit
echoing
large

   
    religious
subjects
emanations?

worship
reverence
respect
harmonious chanting

 
      religious
topics
emanations?

mass
Catholic
priest
communion

         Note the arrangement of the prompters. First is written the word or concept being broken out. Directly under it is the particular category to be considered. Finally comes the word "emanations," followed by a question mark. This methodology was developed as the best means of directing a query into the neural "data storage area" of the subconscious without inadvertent "hinting," suggestion, or engagement of analytic processes. The word "emanations" represents the sub-elements or component parts of the "religious" cognitron which emerged from the subconscious as a collective concept for these sub-elements. Because it possesses the combined neural energy of the aforementioned components, during Stage IV the overall cognitron-concept is able to pass into the conscious awareness of the viewer with relative ease. The sub-elements themselves, however, have insufficient impetus to individually break unaided through the Liminal barrier into the consciousness of the viewer, and must intentionally be invoked through the Stage V process.

         It is suspected that the most amount of information will probably be derived from attribute or topic categories, though at times both object and subject headings might provide significant volumes of information. If, as occasionally may happen, all four categories are prompted and no responses result, it can be supposed that one of two situations exist: the response being stage-fived is either already at its lowest form, or it is really AOL.

      D.  Implications:

         The value of Stage V is readily apparent. Though the sum total of the information obtained quite validly might produce the overall cognitron of "religious" in the context of an RV session, once rendered down to its sub-elements and details the cognitron produces a wealth of additional information of use to the analyst.

      E.  Considerations:

         The process has a few peculiarities and a few cautions to observe. First, one must be aware that not every cognitron necessarily produces responses for every category, and in those that do, some categories are inevitably more heavily represented than others. In general, the rule is that if the list of words that the viewer produces under the particular category being processed does not flow smoothly, regularly, rapidly, and with obvious spontaneity, the end of accessible information has been reached. Therefore, if there is a pause after the last word recorded of more than a few seconds, the end of the cluster has probably been reached. On the other hand, if after the original prompting nothing comes forth spontaneously, there are probably no accessible emanations pertaining to the cognitron being processed in that category. For example, if the viewer just sits with pen on paper, with nothing to objectify after the viewer has written "religious," "topics" (or other category), and "emanations?" then topic-type information was probably not relevant to the formation of that cognitron. If such a situation should occur either at the beginning of a category or at the end of one more productive, the viewer should either on his own or with encouragement from the monitor declare an end to that particular category and move on to the next. Usually, the viewer is intuitively aware when more valid information remains to be retrieved and when the end of a cluster has been reached. To sit too long waiting for more information if none is readily available engages the analytic process and encourages the generation of AOL.

         The viewer must also be aware that some responses might at one time or another appear in any one or more of the category columns. One example frequently given is "warm." Although one might consider this an attribute of some object-related word, as a concept of temperature "warm" could just as well show up in the Object column itself. "Electronic," on the other hand, is unlikely to be an object, but could easily fit into attribute, subject or topic columns.

      F.  Switches:

         The "switch" is another issue that needs to be properly understood in conjunction with the Stage V process. Sometimes, the viewer will be busily recording a string of emanations under a particular category when suddenly emanations from another category intrude. For example:

religious
objects
emanations?

robes
candles
hall
quiet
long
dimly lit
echoing...

         Notice that a few "object" words come through at first, to be replaced spontaneously by words more appropriate to the "attribute" category. This is known as a "switch"--a point in a Stage V chain where a sudden switch is made from one category to another. There are several possible causes for this. The first is that the viewer has in a sense skipped down a level in detail, and proceeds to provide sub-elements of information for the last valid item in the category--in the above example the words quiet, long, etc., are attributes of "hall," instead of objects belonging to "religious."

         A second possibility is that all emanations of a given category are exhausted without the viewer being conscious of the fact, and emanations from another category begin to intrude out of proper structure, as shown below:

robes
candles
soothing
dim
peaceful
decorated

         Finally, it may be the case that no emanations of the proper type might manifest themselves, but only intruders from another category, Such a situation would indicate that no emanations of the sort that would be expected for the prompted category are present, and that such emanations were obviously not important in the formation of the cognitron being Stage-fived.

         To deal with a switch, one must task the system (after analyzing what has happened) using an alternative category suggest by the trend in the data line. In other words, if attributes are produced by the switch, one should shift to the "attribute" category and re-prompt the word/cognitron under examination.

      G.  AOL and Stage V:

         Objects and Attributes may be considered "objective elements," in that like Stage IIs, these responses are much less likely to spark AOLs. Topics and Subjects, on the other hand, are "subjective, informational elements," and require special attention to avoid AOL contamination.

         AOL too may lend itself to being "stage-fived." It is axiomatic in this RV theory system that analytic overlay is generally valid, site-related information which the analytic centers of the brain have simply taken and "embroidered" with memory associations and suggestive imagery. This implies that accurate information can possibly be derived from an AOL through the Stage V process. For the purposes of Stage V, these kernels of valid site-information are called "prior emanations." The format for "stage-fiving" AOLs is as follows:

AOL mosque
prior emanations?

large
assembly
religious decorations
singing
reverence
scriptures
clergy

         When prompting valid prior emanations from an AOL, it is important to indicate only "AOL," and not say or write "AOL Break" as the viewer has been conditioned to do in most other circumstances involving AOL, since the word "break" is intended both to disengage the viewer from the signal line and to inform the viewer's system that the material occasioning the "break" was not desirable.

         The prior emanations that result from "stage-fiving" an AOL tend to be a mixture of the four Stave V categories, selected words of which could presumably further be "stage-fived."

         Finally, when normal AOL is encountered in the course of a Stage V cluster, which it sometimes is, it should be declared according to the normal practice, and the category re-prompted. If deemed appropriate, such AOL could no doubt also be subjected to Stage V reduction.

      H.  Format:

         A sample format for Stage V follows:

(FORMAT FOR STAGE V)


Name
Date
Time

(Personal Inclemencies/Visuals Declared)

(STAGE I -
Coordinate)
(Ideogram) A Rising
Angles Across
Downs Solid
    B Structures
(STAGE II -
Sensory Data)
S2 rough
smooth
gritty texture
grey
white
red
blue
yellow
orange
clean taste
mixture of smells
warm
bright
noisy
(STAGE II - Dimensionals)   tall
rounded
wide
long
open
 
      AI BREAK
Interesting.
I like it here.
(Stage III)

[STAGE IV]

(SKETCH OR TRACKER)      
S-2 D AI EI T I AOL AOL/S
        structure      
rough
smooth
             
          manmade    
  high
tall
wide
           
    AI BREAK
This is neat!
         
        doors

windows

     
          colorful    
        parapets
building
     
    [SKETCH]          
          foreign feeling    
        people      
      somber
serious
devoted
enthusiastic
       
          secular    
            AOL BREAK
A castle in a city
 
        church      
(STAGE V)

religious
objects
emanations?

robes
candles
incense

     
  religious
attributes
emanations?

quiet
dimly lit
echoing
large

   
    religious
subjects
emanations?

worship
reverence
respect
harmonious chanting

 
      religious
topics
emanations?

mass
Catholic
priest
communion

.

AOL mosque
prior emanations?

large
assembly
religious decorations
singing
reverence
scriptures
clergy


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